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Archive for May, 2012

You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown @ 2012 Stratford Shakespeare Festival

- May 31st, 2012

Charlie Brown_On The Run

From left: Andrew Broderick as Schroeder, Amy Wallis as Sally, Ken James Stewart as Charlie Brown, Stephen Patterson as Snoopy, Erica Peck as Lucy and Kevin Yee as Linus in You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann. Copyright (c) Stratford Shakespeare Festival.

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown is an active, loud (in a good way) & bright family-friendly entertainment. Take your kids (of any ages) & enjoy what director/choreographer Donna Feore & the cast & crew have done with the Charles Schulz legacy.

Many Schulz lines help the dialogue thrive amid the songs, dance, hip hop, kill the wabbit, snoopberry & general fun of the Clark Gesner 1967 musical & its updates. On opening night (Wednesday at the Avon Theatre), it struck JBNBlog how much pain & loneliness & defeat there is in Schulz’s words & world. But there is laughter, too, & it is surprising to see how much much of our pop culture of the last 50 years is based on Peanuts. Many TV sitcoms channel Lucy vs. Charlie, but with less wit & noble suffering. All the goofy dreamers are Snoopy. Woody Allen is a Linus crossed with Charlie Brown & Schroeder, with Bergman standing in for Beethoven.  Happiness Is . . . a diluted message today, but beautifully delivered in the finale here.

The projections of animated material in the production didn’t impress me. But then the Avon is where I saw various multi-media illuminations of my father’s stage wizardry from Colours in the Dark to King Whistle! to Alice Through the Looking-Glass. So my reservations are merely a Lucycrabby outburst & shouldn’t keep others from marvelling at them.

The inevitable London connection:

Oakridge and Western music grad & You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown drummer & percussionist Dale Anne Brendon gets to rawk almost as much as she did last summer with JC Superstar (at least to JBNBlog’s admiring ears) . . . Born in London, she has been playing terrific drums and percussion with just about everyone: The London Youth Symphony and Orchestra London, London rock band Popjoy (a forerunner to The Joys) and London country star Shelly Rastin at Sarnia’s Bayfest as well as the Jeans ‘n Classics band and gigs with ex-Supertramp star Roger Hodgson. (Details from a 2011 story about her).

The inevitable trivia question:

The Baseball Game song & production number has Charlie Brown’s team losing the championship game 2-1. Our hero apparently strikes out (or fails in some quiet, despairing way) to end the game. If memory serves, Charlie’s team almost never came that close & as a pitcher he was always getting hit by vicious line drives. Anyway. Some details of the game on stage (the one-run margin, the championship being on the line with two outs, the bitter defeat) recall a World Series Game 7 lamented at least twice by Schulz in a Peanuts daily comic. (10q, Wikipedia). For the usual prizes, which game & who was at bat? For extra honours, who was on second base representing the potential winning run? For even more of our fantasy awards, what did Charlie Brown have to say about the outcome?

 

Cast (in alphabetical order)
Off Stage Singer……………………………………………………………Troy Adams
Schroeder …………………………………………………………………….Andrew Broderick
Off Stage Singer……………………………………………………………Heather McGuigan
Snoopy ………………………………………………………………………..Stephen Patterson
Lucy ……………………………………………………………………………Erica Peck
Off Stage Singer……………………………………………………………Travis Seetoo
Charlie Brown………………………………………………………………Ken James Stewart
Sally ……………………………………………………………………………Amy Wallis
Linus …………………………………………………………………………..Kevin Yee
Artistic credits
Director and Choreographer …………………………………………..Donna Feore
Musical Director …………………………………………………………..Laura Burton
Set Designer…………………………………………………………………Michael Gianfrancesco
Costume Designer…………………………………………………………Dana Osborne
Lighting Designer …………………………………………………………Kimberly PurtellVideo Designer …………………………………………………………….Sean Nieuwenhuis
Sound Designer…………………………………………………………….Peter McBoyle
Stunt Coordinator………………………………………………………….Daniel Levinson
Associate Conductor…………………………………………………….Mariyln Dallman
Assistant Director………………………………………………………….Kevin Hammond
Assistant Choreographer………………………………………………..Ryan Wilson
Assistant Set Designer …………………………………………………..Brandon Kleiman
Assistant Costume Designer …………………………………………..Joanna Yu
Assistant Lighting Designer……………………………………………C.J. Astronomo
Assistant Lighting Designer……………………………………………Jareth Li
Video Game Designer……………………………………………………Dylan Woodley
Sound Design Assistant …………………………………………………William Fallon
Dance and Stunt Captain………………………………………………..Heather McGuigan
Stage Manager ……………………………………………………………..Meghan Callan
Assistant Stage Manager………………………………………………..Michael Hart
Assistant Stage Manager………………………………………………..Melanie Klodt Wong
Assistant Stage Manager………………………………………………..Holly Korhonen
Production Assistant ……………………………………………………..Kenilee Kehler
Production Stage Manager……………………………………………..Julie Miles
Production Stage Manager ……………………………………………Maxwell T. Wilson
Technical Director ………………………………………………………..Elissa Horscroft

42nd Street @ Stratford Shakespeare Festival

- May 30th, 2012

462_42ndStreet_On The Run

Members of the company in 42nd Street. Photo by David Hou. Copyright (c) Stratford Shakespeare Festival.

Intelligence & energy & love are the qualities to go with the classic Americana of 42nd Street, which opened at the Festival Theatre (remember that . . . we drove to the Avon by mistake at first) on Tuesday.

The audience’s enthusiasm for the deftly thunderous tap routines early on & the return of Cynthia Dale to the Stratford stage were notable . . . Dale is in a role (Dorothy Brock) which partly plays off a measure of self-awareness (down to her being last on stage for the encore) on her part, the audience’s & the book’s (there’s a joke about the Dale character’s absence allowing the dance routines to be put back into the show-within-a show Pretty Lady.)

But back to intelligence, energy, love . . . Gary Griffin’s direction brought out the intelligence & energy of the magnificent Harry Warren-Al Dubin score chiefly drawn from their 1933 film collaboration on the Lloyd Bacon-directed, Busby Berkeley-auteured 42nd Street. All the songs are terrific & the cast & Griffin obviously love the material — and the choreography devised by Alex Sanchez. It’s a love lifted by the orchestra in a loft atop the proceedings – they cheerfully join in the jests at a couple of points. (A Tin Pan Alley scholar has suggested working with Warren inspired Dubin to his wittiest, grittiest lyrics . . .  just listen up to Shuffle Off to Buffalo even as you are humming along).

This is not the first time, just the happiest in JBNBlog’s memory, that so many tapdancers have commanded a fest stage in a classic bit of old Broadway. A number of the same factors — classic music theatre score (by the Gershwins for that show), plenty of tap dancing & a cast including Dale & London’s Kyle Blair — were all present in 2007′s beloved by everyone but JBNBlog My One & Only, which was minus Griffin & others. This year, Blair is v. good as Billy Lawlor, the tenor in pursuit of the also excellent Jennifer Rider-Shaw as the heroic walk-on Peggy Sawyer, who saves the show within a show in 42nd Street.

Anyway. Somewhere underneath the anxious gaiety of the music & dance is the cast’s knowing it is just one bad night away from falling back to the bread lines during the Depression . . . & so the financial woes of life & showbiz have a contemporary currency. Which makes the spectacle of We’re in the Money (seen in the photograph here) all the more intelligent, energetic & loving.

The inevitable London connection in a flashback to Kyle Blair in the summer of 2007:

What follows is what I wrote in a five-year-old post detailing my glum reaction to 2007′s My One & Only at the Avon Theatre:

In keeping with our London watch, it must be said Oakridge grad Kyle Blair roller skates, taps, has comedy routines and looks perfectly groomed in tux, tails, etc. Obviously, the rope twirling in Oklahoma! (a much greater and more enjoyable 2007 production than My One and Only) is just part of what he is being called on to do at Stratford this summer. He and his fellow New Rhythm Boys are forced through a couple of truly precious (a euphemism of sorts, but I just can’t think of the right word) song & dance routines (s&d, maybe the musicale equivalent of s&m?) that could be excised. In that woe, they are hardly unique – the tappppppping in general goes on just about forever. Which is the point, I guess.

Inevitable trivia question:

Shadow Waltz provides the throaty & come-hither moment in which Cynthia Dale is first heard singing again at Stratford, in a lovely version of the 1933 Warren-Dubin evergreen. (Like We’re in the Money, it was apparently written for Gold Diggers of 1933 & it  seems to have also been known as Waltz of the Shadows, imdb.com indicates). Between the 1933 film appearances & the 1980 musical devised from the film and songs of 42nd Street (which is the version you will enjoy so much at Stratford), it may have languished in the shadows. At least one jazz giant, known for choosing unlikely Broadway tunes, treasured it & recorded it on a landmark 1950s’ album. Who was that colossus & for extra points which two titans completed the Shadow Waltz trio?


Cast (in alphabetical order)

Julian Marsh…………………………………………………………………………………………. Sean Arbuckle

Archie………………………………………………………………………………………………. Matthew Armet

Robin…………………………………………………………………………………………………… Carla Bennett

Billy Lawlor………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Kyle Blair

Annie “Anytime” Reilly…………………………………………………………………………… Naomi Costain

Frankie………………………………………………………………………………………………… Stephen Cota

Phyllis Dale……………………………………………………………………………………….. Rachel Crowther

Dorothy Brock…………………………………………………………………………………………. Cynthia Dale

Mac……………………………………………………………………………………………………. Carl Danielsen

Danillo Panaducci……………………………………………………………………………….. Nicko Giannakos

Andy Lee……………………………………………………………………………………………… Kyle Golemba

Lawrence Arthur…………………………………………………………………………………….. Larry Herbert

Gladys……………………………………………………………………………………………….. Julianne Hobby

Millie …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Jessica Horn

Lorraine Flemming……………………………………………………………………………………. Kayla James

Pat Denning……………………………………………………………………………………… C. David Johnson

Maggie Jones……………………………………………………………………………………… Gabrielle Jones

Ethel……………………………………………………………………………………………… Lorena Mackenzie

Peggy Sawyer………………………………………………………………………………. Jennifer Rider-Shaw

Abner Dillon……………………………………………………………………………………………… Steve Ross

Jerry Conway……………………………………………………………………………………… Jay T. Schramek

Elroy Mahoney……………………………………………………………………………………… David Silvestri

Diane Lorimer……………………………………………………………………………………. Jennifer Stewart

Dominic Viau………………………………………………………………………………………………. Jordan Till

Bert Barry……………………………………………………………………………………………. Geoffrey Tyler

 

Artistic credits

Director………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Gary Griffin

Choreographer………………………………………………………………………………………. Alex Sanchez

Musical Director…………………………………………………………………………………… Michael Barber

Designer……………………………………………………………………………………………… Debra Hanson

Lighting Designer……………………………………………………………………………………….. Paul Miller

Sound Designer……………………………………………………………………………………. Peter McBoyle

Associate Choreographer……………………………………………………………………………. Kerry Gage

Associate Conductor………………………………………………………………………………. Franklin Brasz

Stunt Coordinator………………………………………………………………………………………. Simon Fon

Assistant Director……………………………………………………………………….. Kristen Van Ginhoven

Assistant Set Designer………………………………………………………………………………. Devon Bhim

Assistant Costume Designer…………………………………………………………………. Kimberly Catton

Assistant Lighting Designer…………………………………………………………………….. C.J. Astronomo

Assistant Lighting Designer…………………………………………………………………….. Tristan Tidswell

Assistant Sound Designer …………………………………………………………………………. Verne Good

Dance Captain ………………………………………………………………………………………. Stephen Cota

Stunt Captain………………………………………………………………………………………… Kyle Golemba

Stage Manager………………………………………………………………………………….. Cynthia Toushan

Assistant Stage Manager……………………………………………………………………. Kristopher Weber

Assistant Stage Manager…………………………………………………………………………. Zeph Williams

Assistant Stage Manager…………………………………………………………………… Maxwell T. Wilson

Production Assistant…………………………………………………………………………………… Kelsey Rae

Production Stage Manager………………………………………………………………….. Margaret Palmer

Technical Director……………………………………………………………………………………… Jeff Scollon

Pinball wizards: Des McAnuff & Pete Townshend rawk the gala

- May 29th, 2012

Des_Pete

Recipient Des McAnuff, left, and Pete Townshend from the band The Who put on the final act during the Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards Gala at the NAC in Ottawa on Saturday, May 5, 2012.  (Matthew Usherwood, QMI Agency)

Congrats to QMI Agency colleague Matthew Usherwood for this ace photo & to colleagues at the Beacon Herald for running it big & beautiful in their Festival Edition 2012.

Off to see the  in a bit. One of the Toronto papers was saying there is a rumour Des McAnuff may be back at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival next year in a revisit to . . . The Who’s Tommy, the hit 1990s’ musical he co-wrote with Pete Townshend. Which would make this excellent image somewhat prophetic . . . there has to be a twist . . . a pinball wizard photographer has such a subtle wrist. Etc.

Much Ado About Nothing @ Stratford Shakespeare Festival 2012

- May 29th, 2012

muchado

Ben Carlson (Benedick) and Deborah Hay (Beatrice) in the image from the Stratford Shakespeare Festival (c) 2102′s program for Much Ado About Nothing.

Everything JBNBlog thinks you need to know about Much Ado About Nothing, an excellent opening night (Monday) for the 60th anniversary season at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. There are many merry laughs and enough melancholy, handled with care, to illuminate a summer’s eve.

1. Ben Carlson (Benedick, better without the beard, which disappears as he woos) Beatrice — Deborah Hay — are both stellar. Hay takes a faux tumble down the spirally staircase, so startled is she at overhearing Hero and her gentlewoman Ursula discussing Benedick’s unrequited love for Beatrice. Watch how she skids to a stop before calamity ensues! Then, in his counterpoint scene, Carlson nimbly works his way around the stage on all fours, even reversing gear at top speed. That’s just some of the admirable physical comedy.

2. Their verbal exchanges should be required viewing for all sitcom actors for an understanding of how to match pauses, weights & waits, inflections & more at rapid fire pace — all while firing off superb Shakespeare insults.

3. Director Christopher Newton has imported many Shaw Festival hallmarks — boaters, pianos, dances — but what stays with me more is the way this Much conjures up everything from Taming of the Shrew to The Winter’s Tale to Measure for Measure (the fantastical duke of dark corners).

4. The young lovers — Hero (Bethany Jillard) and Claudio (Tyrone Savage) — have to be strong enough to keep their plot going during the BvsB fireworks . . . they are, with Savage conveying Claudio’s basic being a jerk & Jillard convincing JBNBlog her Hero is able to forgive Claudio. Though she really shouldn’t. She should wait, as Beatrice does, for the right match.

5. The consequence of such a wait is profound loneliness . . . there is a lovely fadeout moment of Beatrice alone . . . & she & Benedick are proof that rudeness as protection for shyness can lead to solitude . . .  Don Pedro (the always ace Juan Chioran) woos Hero on Claudio’s behalf (the success is illusory) and  seems to woo Beatrice for a moment, is politely/wittily rejected & winds up being told twice “get thee a wife, get thee a wife” by the newly/finally wise-in-love Benedick. Don Pedro circles the dancers at the end. Doomed to wait forever outside the dance is the vile Don John (fine one-note performance as the spiteful rotter by Gareth Potter) off-stage at the finale.

6. Dogberry & the Watch reimagined as Wild wacky West (sort of). V. good. Liked pretty much everything, sure there are lots of dances, but that’s how Much Ado ends. At Benedick’s command.

The inevitable Londonont connection:

Shaw Festival star Deborah Hay laughs about her stint as Audrey in Little Shop of Horrors, while her brother, Mike, was Seymour — but the experience completely changed her focus in life.

Hay was in Grade 12 at John Paul II Catholic secondary school when she played Audrey.

Thanks to the encouragement of a teacher, Hay took on the role that eventually led her down an incredible career path. This year (2010) she has leading roles in One Touch of Venus and The Women at the Shaw.

“I had an amazing teacher there — Pat Spadini. He was my acting teacher. Before that I never even thought it was something I’d be capable of doing. He instilled so much confidence in me,” Hay said.

“He was just a real mentor for me and he changed my life. I’ll be eternally grateful to that man.”

– a classic bit of coverage by former LFP and lfpress.com colleague Kathy Rumleski from her theatre beat work in the summer of 2010

Inevitable trivia question aka #stratfordhistoryquiz

Christopher Newton acted in three seasons at the festival in the 1960s. Among his roles was Paris in 1968′s Romeo and Juliet. For all the marbles, & the usual prizes, & no Wikipedia pls!, who was that production’s Romeo?

#ldnont cricket thoughts via South Asia: The Commonwealth’s Game

- May 25th, 2012

sri lanka cricket
Disappointed Sri Lanka players watch their opponents lift the trophy, India v Sri Lanka, final, World Cup 2011, Mumbai, April 2, 2011©Getty Images

The appearance of cricket results from India’s professional league on the LFP sports agate page (yay!) this week reminded JBNBlog it must be The Commonwealth’s Game.

This insight had arrived first via a 2007 trip to India when the India cricket team was staying in the same hotel & there was Beatlemania-worthy fandom outside. Three years later, Christmas in Australia meant a stay in Melbourne while England crunched Australia in The Ashes to the agony of our gracious hosts. TV coverage revealed strategy, athleticism & witty celebrations (from the England cricketers) previously unknown to JBNBlog.

In the spirit of those reports in this week’s LFP, here are samples of reactions from our South Asian friends & acquaintances gathered over the 14 months since India’s triumph in the 2011 World Cup. Our smiling friends from India immediately reported joy & celebrations surpassing Diwali back home. Our friends from Sri Lanka were proud of their country’s role as host & offered a complex explanation for its loss to India in the final, something to do with Sri Lanka’s star bowler & so lost on me. My bad. (In baseball terms, it would be a bit like a Dodger fan explaining the 1966 World Series loss to my Orioles in terms of Sandy Koufax’s mechanics being slightly off. Well. Maybe.) An electrical engineer/cab driver from Pakistan was blunt about Pakistan’s loss to India. That match had been fixed. Somehow. As always.

India vs. Pakistan? That 2007 India team staying in the Mumbai hotel had left for a World Cup in the West Indies & performed poorly. The only consolation for our friends then was Pakistan’s performance. Even worse.

With its “blue billion” fans in India & millions more in other Commonwealth countries, cricket is our common game. Even more than soccer. It is a pleasure to see the results occasionally in The Free Press.

Even if . . . big admission time . . . those figures & details mystify JBNBlog completely.

Any help in understanding the epic details which follow — courtesy of espncricinfo.com — would be gratefully appreciated.

The details of that April 2, 2011 match at Mumbai entranced many friends . . . JBNBlog would like to know how to read it.

 

Sri Lanka innings (50 overs maximum) R M B 4s 6s SR
View dismissal WU Tharanga c Sehwag b Khan 2 30 20 0 0 10.00
View dismissal TM Dilshan b Harbhajan Singh 33 87 49 3 0 67.34
View dismissal KC Sangakkara*† c †Dhoni b Yuvraj Singh 48 102 67 5 0 71.64
DPMD Jayawardene not out 103 159 88 13 0 117.04
View dismissal TT Samaraweera lbw b Yuvraj Singh 21 53 34 2 0 61.76
View dismissal CK Kapugedera c Raina b Khan 1 6 5 0 0 20.00
View dismissal KMDN Kulasekara run out (†Dhoni) 32 41 30 1 1 106.66
NLTC Perera not out 22 10 9 3 1 244.44
Extras (b 1, lb 3, w 6, nb 2) 12
Total (6 wickets; 50 overs; 246 mins) 274 (5.48 runs per over)
Did not bat SL MalingaS RandivM Muralitharan
Fall of wickets 1-17 (Tharanga, 6.1 ov), 2-60 (Dilshan, 16.3 ov), 3-122 (Sangakkara, 27.5 ov),4-179 (Samaraweera, 38.1 ov), 5-182 (Kapugedera, 39.5 ov), 6-248 (Kulasekara, 47.6 ov)
Bowling O M R W Econ
View wickets Z Khan 10 3 60 2 6.00 (1w)
S Sreesanth 8 0 52 0 6.50 (2nb)
MM Patel 9 0 41 0 4.55 (1w)
View wicket Harbhajan Singh 10 0 50 1 5.00 (1w)
View wickets Yuvraj Singh 10 0 49 2 4.90
SR Tendulkar 2 0 12 0 6.00 (3w)
V Kohli 1 0 6 0 6.00
India innings (target: 275 runs from 50 overs) R M B 4s 6s SR
View dismissal V Sehwag lbw b Malinga 0 2 2 0 0 0.00
View dismissal SR Tendulkar c †Sangakkara b Malinga 18 21 14 2 0 128.57
View dismissal G Gambhir b Perera 97 187 122 9 0 79.50
View dismissal V Kohli c & b Dilshan 35 69 49 4 0 71.42
MS Dhoni*† not out 91 128 79 8 2 115.18
Yuvraj Singh not out 21 39 24 2 0 87.50
Extras (b 1, lb 6, w 8) 15
Total (4 wickets; 48.2 overs; 230 mins) 277 (5.73 runs per over)
Did not bat SK RainaHarbhajan SinghZ KhanMM PatelS Sreesanth

 

Fall of wickets 1-0 (Sehwag, 0.2 ov), 2-31 (Tendulkar, 6.1 ov), 3-114 (Kohli, 21.4 ov), 4-223 (Gambhir, 41.2 ov)
Bowling O M R W Econ
View wickets SL Malinga 9 0 42 2 4.66 (2w)
KMDN Kulasekara 8.2 0 64 0 7.68
View wicket NLTC Perera 9 0 55 1 6.11 (2w)
S Randiv 9 0 43 0 4.77
View wicket TM Dilshan 5 0 27 1 5.40 (1w)
M Muralitharan 8 0 39 0 4.87 (1w)
Match details
Toss Sri Lanka, who chose to bat
Series India won the 2010/11 ICC Cricket World Cup
Player of the match MS Dhoni (India)
Player of the series Yuvraj Singh (India)
Umpires Aleem Dar (Pakistan) and SJA Taufel (Australia)
TV umpire IJ Gould (England)
Match referee JJ Crowe (New Zealand)
Reserve umpire SJ Davis (Australia)
Match notes
  • Sri Lanka innings
  • Powerplay 1: Overs 0.1 – 10.0 (Mandatory – 31 runs, 1 wicket)
  • Powerplay 2: Overs 10.1 – 15.0 (Bowling side – 27 runs, 0 wicket)
  • Sri Lanka: 50 runs in 12.5 overs (79 balls), Extras 5
  • Drinks: Sri Lanka – 56/1 in 14.0 overs (TM Dilshan 31, KC Sangakkara 17)
  • Sri Lanka: 100 runs in 23.6 overs (146 balls), Extras 6
  • 3rd Wicket: 50 runs in 56 balls (KC Sangakkara 21, DPMD Jayawardene 30, Ex 0)
  • Drinks: Sri Lanka – 128/3 in 29.0 overs (DPMD Jayawardene 34, TT Samaraweera 5)
  • Over 31.3: Review by India (Bowling), Umpire – Aleem Dar, Batsman – TT Samaraweera (Struck down)
  • Sri Lanka: 150 runs in 33.1 overs (201 balls), Extras 7
  • DPMD Jayawardene: 50 off 49 balls (6 x 4)
  • 4th Wicket: 50 runs in 56 balls (DPMD Jayawardene 27, TT Samaraweera 19, Ex 4)
  • Over 38.1: Review by India (Bowling), Umpire – SJA Taufel, Batsman – TT Samaraweera (Upheld)
  • Over 43.1: Review by India (Bowling), Umpire – Aleem Dar, Batsman – KMDN Kulasekara (Struck down)
  • Sri Lanka: 200 runs in 43.3 overs (263 balls), Extras 11
  • Powerplay 3: Overs 45.1 – 50.0 (Batting side – 63 runs, 1 wicket)
  • 6th Wicket: 50 runs in 44 balls (DPMD Jayawardene 23, KMDN Kulasekara 31, Ex 1)
  • DPMD Jayawardene: 100 off 84 balls (13 x 4)
  • Sri Lanka: 250 runs in 48.3 overs (293 balls), Extras 11
  • Innings Break: Sri Lanka – 274/6 in 50.0 overs (DPMD Jayawardene 103, NLTC Perera 22)
  • India innings
  • Powerplay 1: Overs 0.1 – 10.0 (Mandatory – 41 runs, 2 wickets)
  • Over 0.2: Review by India (Batting), Umpire – Aleem Dar, Batsman – V Sehwag (Struck down)
  • Powerplay 2: Overs 10.1 – 15.0 (Bowling side – 40 runs, 0 wicket)
  • India: 50 runs in 10.6 overs (66 balls), Extras 2
  • Drinks: India – 81/2 in 15.0 overs (G Gambhir 40, V Kohli 19)
  • 3rd Wicket: 50 runs in 53 balls (G Gambhir 28, V Kohli 19, Ex 3)
  • G Gambhir: 50 off 56 balls (6 x 4)
  • India: 100 runs in 19.3 overs (117 balls), Extras 7
  • India: 150 runs in 29.5 overs (179 balls), Extras 10
  • 4th Wicket: 50 runs in 60 balls (G Gambhir 25, MS Dhoni 22, Ex 3)
  • Drinks: India – 165/3 in 32.0 overs (G Gambhir 79, MS Dhoni 23)
  • India: 200 runs in 37.5 overs (227 balls), Extras 11
  • MS Dhoni: 50 off 52 balls (4 x 4)
  • 4th Wicket: 100 runs in 106 balls (G Gambhir 40, MS Dhoni 54, Ex 6)
  • Over 44.3: Review by Sri Lanka (Bowling), Umpire – Aleem Dar, Batsman – Yuvraj Singh (Struck down)
  • Powerplay 3: Overs 45.1 – 50.0 (Batting side – 32 runs, 0 wicket)
  • India: 250 runs in 46.2 overs (278 balls), Extras 15
  • 5th Wicket: 50 runs in 42 balls (MS Dhoni 31, Yuvraj Singh 21, Ex 2)
  • Attendance – 42,000