Make Canoe my Homepage

Review: Mio Lifesaver II emergency battery pack

- March 21st, 2014

LS2-100

At the risk of sounding repetitive, there’s no shortage of battery packs out there on the market. They come in all different shapes, sizes and capacities. However, one neat little package is the Lifesaver II emergency battery pack by Mio, which stands out amongst others with its minimalist design and fast charging capability.

Read more…

ClipR turns your headphones wireless

- March 1st, 2014

RedCLip

Don’t you just wish your favourite headphones or speakers were wireless? If your wired audio accessories have a 3.5” connector or jack, a new little gadget –ClipR by Muse Mini – can turn them wireless through Bluetooth 4.0 or NFC (Near Field Communication).

ClipR acts as a transceiver in the form of a lightweight rubber polymer coated disc, shaped like a bulked up poker chip – 42mm wide and 8mm high.

Read more…

Review: UbiSlate 7Ci tablet

- February 20th, 2014

Have you been thinking about getting a tablet but wasn’t really sure if it was worth it? Most tablets can’t measure up to laptops and the few that do cost a pretty penny. But even the cheaper ones can put a bit of a dent in your wallet. That is, until now.

I recently had a chance to test out the UbiSlate 7Ci, which has the distinction of being the world’s cheapest tablet. As the Canadian-based DataWind as a low-cost alternative to mobile devices for people in developing world, the device retails here for only $37.99.

Datawind's UbiSlate 7Ci

DataWind’s UbiSlate 7Ci. (HO)

The UbiSlate 7Ci is actually part of a family of low-cost 7-inch tablets, which includes the $79.99 7C+ and the $129.99 3G7. The main difference between them is that while the 7Ci is Wi-Fi only, the 7C+ and 3G7 run on the Edge and 3G networks, respectively. Other than that, the specs are roughly the same.

Read more…

Review: Alienware 14 Gaming Laptop

- January 7th, 2014
Alienware 14

Alienware 14. (HO)

Admittedly, I’m not much of a PC gamer anymore. But I used to be. Growing up, I never owned any consoles, so I did all my gaming on computer – mostly on an oversized desktop computer that I would upgrade with new graphic cards, RAM, hard drives and even sometimes new motherboards as need required.

But after years of frustration with issues installing new games, from annoyware authentication software that often crippled Windows, to the games just failing to install properly, I gave up on the format for the most part. Since 2006, I have played video games almost exclusively on the PlayStation 3 (and occasionally on the Xbox 360).

So I wasn’t sure to expect from Dell’s Alienware 14 Gaming Laptop.

Read more…