Make Canoe my Homepage

Review: UbiSlate 7Ci tablet

- February 20th, 2014

Have you been thinking about getting a tablet but wasn’t really sure if it was worth it? Most tablets can’t measure up to laptops and the few that do cost a pretty penny. But even the cheaper ones can put a bit of a dent in your wallet. That is, until now.

I recently had a chance to test out the UbiSlate 7Ci, which has the distinction of being the world’s cheapest tablet. As the Canadian-based DataWind as a low-cost alternative to mobile devices for people in developing world, the device retails here for only $37.99.

Datawind's UbiSlate 7Ci

DataWind’s UbiSlate 7Ci. (HO)

The UbiSlate 7Ci is actually part of a family of low-cost 7-inch tablets, which includes the $79.99 7C+ and the $129.99 3G7. The main difference between them is that while the 7Ci is Wi-Fi only, the 7C+ and 3G7 run on the Edge and 3G networks, respectively. Other than that, the specs are roughly the same.

Read more…

Going below the Surface 2

- November 18th, 2013
Microsoft Surface 2

Microsoft Surface 2. (Supplied)

If you’re looking to get a tablet but want to keep the Windows experience, it might be worth looking at Microsoft’s own tablet – the Surface. Last month, the company released the Surface 2 and Surface Pro 2, the second-generation of their Windows tablets. I had the opportunity to check out the Surface 2.

Read more…

Dell’s Latitude 10 a decent tablet

- October 6th, 2013
Dell Latitude 10

Dell Latitude 10. (Supplied)

If you’re looking a tablet, there are a lot of options out there. Of course, there are couple of different iPads to choose from and a veritable army of droids, but generally speaking Windows tablets don’t get the same kind of notice. Part of this may be because, until the last couple of years, the mobile Windows experience was frankly just terrible. And while Microsoft improved thw OS with Windows Phone 7 and 8, the nice thing about Windows tablets, now, is that they’re advanced enough that they don’t necessarily need a mobile version of Windows to run on them.

Granted, many Windows tablets run on Windows RT, which, strictly speaking, is a mobile version of Windows for devices based on the ARM architecture. (This is the most common architecture for tablets as most Android tablets use ARM processors.) But it is a full OS, offering much of the same functionality as Windows 8. My main issue with Windows RT devices is that since the OS has been optimized for a different architecture than your desktop (or laptop), you can only run programs on it that you can find RT versions for – usually through the Windows Store. So even if I could find an RT version for every program I could ever want, I instinctively lean towards tablets that run Windows 8. And one of those that’s worth a look is the Dell Latitude 10…

Read more…

XPS 18 AIO straddles the line between a tablet and a desktop

- August 21st, 2013
XPS 18 AIO

XPS 18 All-in-One computer. (Supplied)

When I’m in a store, and I see a 24-inch all-in-one computer, with a wireless mouse and keyboard, my mind immediately accepts that’s it’s a desktop replacement.

But when the screen is only 18.4 inches, a funny thing a happens. I know it can still easily be used as a desktop, it’s actually still somewhat portable. Throw in a touchscreen and you have what appears to be an oversized tablet.

Read more…

Claris Companion – A communication device for the elderly

- August 14th, 2013
The Claris Companion

The Claris Companion features a 10-inch screen and loud speakers for the hearing impaired. It has a six-hour battery life and connects to its docking station with magnets, making it easier to people with arthritis to use. (Supplied)

When designing a communication device for seniors, Geof Auchinleck, CEO of Claris Healthcare, said the goal was to make something easy to use, as many in that age group are technophobes.

Read more…