Green Party leader defends Tory MP’s moot gendercide motion

- April 18th, 2013

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Conservative MP Mark Warawa’s effort to raise the issue of “gendercide” in the House of Commons is over.

A parliamentary committee unanimously shoved aside expert advice in late March to declare his motion to condemn sex-selective abortion non-votable, and now Warawa says he won’t appeal that decision to the speaker.

“I’ve decided to continue working on the sex-selection, gendercide issue by speaking at universities, giving lectures and engaging in debates,” the British Columbia politician said Wednesday.

It’s widely rumoured that Prime Minster Stephen Harper orchestrated the committee decision to kill Warawa’s motion because it mentioned abortion.

An appeal to the speaker would have required a two-day secret ballot in the Commons on whether the committee’s decision should be overruled.

Instead of risking defeat on that, Warawa plans to introduce a new private member’s bill on Thursday — the Safe at Home Bill — meant to tighten the rules around house arrest for child sexual predators.

“This bill is a result of a sexual offender in my riding of Langley who was permitted to serve house arrest right next door to his young victim,” Warawa said. “In another case, the sexual offender served house arrest across the street from the victim.”

He says that leaves victims and their families living in fear.

While Warawa’s bill could find favour with Harper, Green Party Leader Elizabeth May says it’s “distrubring” Warawa’s motion became so controversial.

“It’s an abuse of our health-care system to choose to abort a foetus … because you want to have a baby, but you don’t want to have that (particular) baby because it’s a girl,” said May. “You can find loads of quotes from loads of MPs in every party who say we find this abhorrent.”

May says she probably would have voted against Warawa’s motion anyway because it had been cast as an attempt to “open the abortion debate.”

Meantime, Warawa’s complaint that his own party violated his right to make a statement about his motion in the Commons is still before the speaker.

“He’s having further interventions in the House and he will make a ruling on that,” Warawa said.

He says Conservative Whip Gordon O’Connor unfairly yanked him off the list of MPs making statements in late March.

That’s left backbench Tories grumbling about party control, something MP Leon Benoit says is “the same in all caucuses.”

Categories: Conservatives, General, Government, Green Party, Health, Politics, Social issues

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2 comments

  1. amy says:

    she finds the practice abhorrent, yet she would still vote against it. makes NO sense.

  2. Jen says:

    Really Elizabeth May, strange, how is it that she does not stand up against those mps in the ndp for not voting or forced to vote against the very issue which they constantly speak on say, the aboriginal women.

    It really amazing that bills brought in by the cpc for the aboriginal married women who have asked the conservatives for help like bill S-2 was voted down by the opposition parties.
    What about those ndp mps rights to vote for bills for the aboriginal people?

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