• In technology we trust — too much by John Robson Heartbleed scares me. Internet weaknesses really are big news, unlike a lot of things that get headlines. So our reaction scares me even more. I do give kudos to the Canada [...]

  • Western nations shrug off defence duty by John Robson With Vladimir Putin drooling over the rest of Ukraine the plan seems to be to stick our tongues out at him. Laden with sententious rhetoric, to be sure. But we can’t shake [...]

  • Kicking down doors of High River gun controversy by Lorne Gunter The more that comes to light about the RCMP’s High River gun grab following last spring’s devastating flooding in southern Alberta, the more obvious it is the [...]

  • Putting aside politics to mourn Flaherty by Brian Lilley Thursday’s big political news in Ottawa was supposed to be about CBC’s mass layoff announcement. Thursday was supposed to be a day for the opposition parties to [...]

  • Canada wins with PQ loss by Warren Kinsella Au revoir , separatists. Don’t let the door hit you on your way out. OK, OK, we know. We shouldn’t get too cocky about the Parti Quebecois’ decisive loss in Monday night’s [...]

>> <<

VIDEO: Moments from Jim Flaherty’s funeral

- April 16th, 2014


Christine and “the boys” share their memories

Jim Flaherty’s sister Norah speaks

Prime Minister Stephen Harper remembers his friend

VIDEO: The collapse of free speech

- April 16th, 2014

VIDEO: Election law reform

- April 16th, 2014

COLUMN: Robson – Heartbleed bug a frightening prospect

- April 15th, 2014

In technology we trust — too much

by John Robson

Heartbleed scares me. Internet weaknesses really are big news, unlike a lot of things that get headlines. So our reaction scares me even more.

I do give kudos to the Canada Revenue Agency. As soon as the story broke they realized they had a problem they didn’t really understand, so they shut down their tax portals at least until they knew how bad it was. Good call.

Kudos also to Justin Trudeau, who spoke out in support of the agency’s decision. He called Heartbleed a virus, which it’s not. But he got the main thing right, praising the CRA for flexibility and pledging his party’s support. Read more…

VIDEO: A CBC tax?

- April 15th, 2014

Cable bill hike to pay for CBC?

OTTAWA -The head of the CBC is floating the idea of taking a percentage of every cable or satellite bill in Canada as a way to get the state broadcaster more money.

The comments came during a town hall meeting last week where CBC president Hubert Lacroix was discussing plans for 657 job cuts and changes in the wake of CBC’s loss of NHL hockey broadcasts.

During a question and answer session, Lacroix suggested a CBC tax similar to that in Britain. The BBC is funded through a fee on every television in Britain, and in Lacroix’s mind that money should come from cable and satellite companies, known in the industry as BDUs.

“Imagine if in Canada the BDUs decided to give us three or four or five percent of whatever bottom line number and they committed to that over years, maybe that could be something,” Lacroix said.

A CBC spokesman declined to comment on whether the idea has been discussed with the government or industry leaders but did confirm it is something they are considering.

“Our goal is to achieve financial sustainability that allows us to evolve with our audience and stakeholders,” spokesman France Belisle said.

Heritage Minister Shelly Glover’s office threw cold water on the concept.

“The CBC already receives significant taxpayer funds. They can operate within their existing budget,” Marisa Monnin said. “According to the CBC, it is declining viewership that is causing their challenges. It is up to the CBC to provide programming that Canadians actually want to watch.”