COLUMN: Lilley – Homegrown terror and the crisis of confidence

- April 5th, 2013

Search for belonging: Two men who were trying to fit into Western culture never found what they were looking for

by Brian Lilley

The RCMP have now confirmed two young men from London, ON, were among the dead in the terrorist attack on an Algerian gas plant earlier this year.

One of the big questions now is, how do two men born and raised in Canada turn their back on the country and culture to take up the cause of global jihadism?

Part of the answer, I would argue, is that these men were looking for something to believe in. They wanted to belong and in official western society today they did not find it.

The West, Canada included, has a crisis of cultural confidence.

In schools, in much of the media and in the official policies of multiculturalism, the young people of our society are continually told the West is wrong, the West is the source of the problem and other cultures are better.

Xris Katsiroubas, one of the deceased, came from a family with a Greek background; we are told the family was Greek Orthodox. The Greeks gave us democracy, one of the pillars of western society; they brought us plays, literature, art, the Olympics and so much more.

The Greek Orthodox Church is rich in theology, history, tradition. It is a full faith.

How much of it did Xris know? That part I can’t answer, but I can tell you the cultural relativism that permeates so much of our society would have discounted the incredible cultural and religious heritage Xris had as his birthright as no more relevant than any other culture, faith or tradition.

I’m not sure how you go from living in Canada, one of the oldest nation state democracies in the world, when you have this rich personal background, and instead adopt a world view that seeks to impose theocracy through violence.

You cannot do that if you are sure of yourself and your own culture.

Mubin Shaikh, the man who helped the RCMP bring down the Toronto 18, says he’s betting the Christian converts to this cause likely were not overly Christian.

“It’s actually very rare to find somebody who’s actually studied Christianity becoming a Muslim,” Shaikh told QMI Agency.

A lukewarm faith, lack of cultural history, awareness. A search for belonging and identity, a search for faith.

In Canada today, it is considered bad form to say we are better than other countries or societies.

As a culture, we lack the courage to condemn evil.

Two years ago, Liberal MP and soon-to-be prime minister of all the Canadas, Justin Trudeau, got all squeamish when a federal guide for immigrants called honour killings and female genital mutilation barbaric.

Trudeau worried the term barbaric wasn’t neutral enough.

When a society can’t condemn honour killings without some of our better-thans getting their knickers in a knot, then you know things are bad. But Trudeau is not alone.

This week, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney put out another guide for newcomers clearly stating Canada does not accept polygamy or forced marriage.

Now NDP MP Jinny Sims is worried this sends the wrong message. Here’s how The Globe and Mail described her comments to them:

“Jinny Sims, the official opposition immigration critic, suggested references to barbaric practices might stigmatize some cultures.”

Good, stigmatize them.

Because there’s no room in Canada for those who accept forced marriages, polygamy, honour killings or female genital mutilation. If we cannot say that, then we are lost and cannot be that beacon and safe haven to those seeking a better life.

Categories: Contributor Columns

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7 comments

  1. Stephen Smith says:

    I would add two other word to why these two chose the path they did ‘poor parenting’

  2. Ken Bulbrook says:

    Let me open with a quote from the article, “It’s actually very rare to find somebody who’s actually studied Christianity becoming a Muslim,” Shaikh told QMI Agency.” I agree with this. I believe we should put the Lord’s Prayer back in school. If we can cater to and promote Islam through such things as turning school lunch rooms into ‘mosqueterias’ then there should be no issue with the later; and considering Shaikh’s quote this may be our greatest defense.

  3. Ken Bulbrook says:

    Let me open with a quote from the article, “It’s actually very rare to find somebody who’s actually studied Christianity becoming a Muslim,” Shaikh told QMI Agency.” I agree with this. I believe we should put the Lord’s Prayer back in school. If we can cater to and promote Islam through such things as turning school lunch rooms into ‘mosqueterias’ then there should be no issue with the reinstating the Lord’s Prayer; and considering Shaikh’s quote this may be our greatest defense.

  4. Andrew Thuswaldner says:

    Well said!

  5. Gordon McDowell says:

    Our government also has a crisis of confidence. How do we know they were there on their own, when NATO is fighting terrorists in some countries and supporting them in others. ie: Libya & Syria.

  6. Jen says:

    Remember when the liberals first introduce ‘ Anti-Terrorist bill’, well, the cpc brought that bill up again and surprise, all three opposition parties(lib, ndp bloc) voted against the bill. I guarantee you Brian, the terrorists are fully aware on whose side the opposition parties support lies.

  7. Gary Slough says:

    “In schools, in much of the media and in the official policies of multiculturalism, the young people of our society are continually told the West is wrong, the West is the source of the problem and other cultures are better.”

    The problem Brian, is that you are separating multiculturalism from its historic roots in western classical liberalism (essentially modern day conservatism) of 19th century Britain. By celebrating pluralism we are actually celebrating western values. That was the genius of 19th century thinkers like Mill and T.H Green. They recognized that government shouldn`t enforce certain conceptions of the good life on all citizens but rather create a society that allowed individuals to determine what path was best for them. Hence, the instrumental value of freedom. Multiculturalism is the logical extension of such liberal beliefs to a modern society dependent upon immigration for economic growth. The state shouldn`t be enforcing certain values on individuals beyond ideas like freedom, tolerance and equality. Other aspects of a person`s life, such as religion and what colour of flag they like, should be left up to their own conscious.

    You may note that multicultural policies have ONLY emerged in western nations and that is not a coincidence. Every time a government official celebrates multiculturalism and pluralism they are in fact reinforcing the value of western civilizations.

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