Archive for May, 2011

Can’t See The Forest For The Trees

- May 31st, 2011

temagamiaerial4

Although the vast majority of Canadians live in urban environments, we tend to define ourselves as a nation through the rugged, wild, natural character of our country.

If asked to describe Canada, most of us would reference water in some form, mountains or rock (depending on where you live), rolling prairies (again depending on where you live), ice and snow in winter, sweltering heat and mosquitos in summer.

But above all else, I think, we define our country as a land of forests — vast, uncountable swathes of trees spreading endlessly north to the Arctic and west (or east, depending on your coast) to the grasslands of southern Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Forests so endless that we could have half a dozen fires, each bigger than Prince Edward Island, raging in Northwestern Ontario this summer and barely be aware of their existence down here on the muggy shores of the Great Lakes.

We take nature’s bounty for granted and look with a certain smug condescension on other nations of the world who do not have such vast, limitless resources or are in the process of squandering what they do have.

I was stunned to find out — and I am assuming you will be too — that this view of ourselves and our position in the natural world is a load of crap.

forest_Canada_map

Really. I know it’s hard to believe, but let me explain.

Just to put your head in the right space, consider these three points:

1. The United States has far, far more forested land than Canada — more than 300 million hectares compared to just over 200 million hectares for poor, barren Canada.

(I visually judge large areas in units of football fields; I cannot conjure up a mental picture of either an acre or hectare, so we’ll stick with the metric hectare since those are the figures I have. A CFL field, by the way, is about two acres and it takes about 2.47 acres to make a hectare so Canada has about a quarter billion CFL football fields worth of forest by my count.)

2. When I think of China, I think of the world’s most populous country — more than 1.3 BILLION people — and one of the world’s oldest societies. A land, in other words, that has been intensively cultivated for eons, a land of rice paddies, not forests. Wrong again. China is smaller in total area than Canada but today has almost exactly the same amount of forested land as Canada — but with an extra 1,265,000,000 mouths to feed.

I’ve been to China, I travelled through its countryside, I’ve hiked in its forests … but I always subconsciously felt there was a city of teeming millions or a sprawling industrial  complex just beyond the treeline. Wrong again.

Chinaforest

One of these photos is from Canada and one is from China. Can you tell which is which?

british-columbia-forests

Answer: Top photo is from Inner Mongolia, bottom photo is from British Columbia

3. Canada’s forest change is basically neutral — new forests grow or are cultivated at approximately the same rate as old forests are cut down or destroyed by fire or pestilence — but both China and the United States are growing more and more forests every year. Over the past decade, U.S. forested land has increased by about a third of one percent each year. Not bad, but nothing compared to China’s staggering 3% a year forest growth rate.

(All this data comes from the wonderfully informative and reliable Economist magazine, which in turn is using global satellite analysis collected by Brazil’s Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais — National Institute for Space Research — to track deforestation in the Amazon and keep tabs on the rest of the earth’s forests.)

So, despite our self image, Canada does not have as much forest wilderness as we believe in our guts we do and we don’t do as good a job as those nasty industrial carbon footprinters, the United States and China, in replenishing our forests.

Here’s a chart The Economist ran a few days ago showing the world’s top 10 countries with largest forest area and here’s a link to the online article accompanying the chart at www.economist.com.

20110604_WOC818

As you can see, Mother Russia has by far the most forest on earth, at around 800 million hectares, followed by Brazil at more than 500 million hectares. (They’re both chewing through their forests at a fair clip, Brazil especially, but that’s a discussion for another time. The fact remains that Russia has four times the amount of forest that Canada does and Brazil’s forested area is about 2.5 times greater than Canada’s, both of which comparative circumstances surprised me. I would have said Russia’s forests were at most double the size of Canada’s and that Canada probably had more forest coverage than Brazil.)

Then there’s the U.S. at about 300 million hectares, Canada and China at just over 200 million hectares each, followed by the rest of the world.

(Again, I would also have said Canada has two or three times more forest than the U.S. I’m starting to get a case of wood envy.)

The next five have some interesting revelations.

For starters, I never would have believed that Australia and Sudan have some of the largest forests in the world. I think of them both as being basically arid desert countries.

And I thought India, like China, had too many people and too much history of human habitation to have much in the way of forests left. And, yes, I’m impressed that India has been increasing its forested land by about .3% a year over the past decade.

So I guess I’ve changed the way I look at Canada and the rest of the world. I don’t feel quite so smug about our endless, majestic wilderness.

forestlake

It’s still there and still vast and still defines us to a large extent, but there are cautionary limits as well.

I think I’ll go out and hug a tree.

Then I’ll dip a toe in Canada’s vast, endless supply of pure, fresh water.

Hey, where did all the water go?

foreststream

The Dog That Cornered Osama Bin Laden

- May 12th, 2011

UPDATE, July 5, 2011: It’s now almost two months since I put up this Nosey Parker blog post and I can’t believe the number of people still reading it — and adding loads of new information in their comments at the end of the post. Thank you all. And thanks for all the added comment info, especially on the wonderful Malinois breed, titanium teeth and the Vietnam dogs. And, yes, I apologize for calling Malinois “stubby”  — that would be like calling Jose Bautista “stubby” because he’s not as tall as Alex Rodriguez. Alan.

NOTE: This blog post is exactly the same as the one entitled “Canadian Connection To Raid On Bin Laden Compound.” I just wanted to reflect two different aspects of the story in the headlines.

When U.S. President Barack Obama went to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, last week for a highly publicized but very private meeting with the commando team that killed Osama bin Laden, only one of the 81 members of the super-secret  SEAL DevGru unit was identified by name: Cairo, the war dog.

Cairo, like most canine members of the elite U.S. Navy SEALs, is a Belgian Malinois. The Malinois breed is similar to German shepherds but smaller and more compact, with an adult male weighing in the 30-kilo range.

skydiving_dog_04

(German shepherds are still used as war dogs by the American military but the lighter, stubbier Malinois is considered better for the tandem parachute jumping and rappelling operations often undertaken by SEAL teams. Labrador retrievers are also favoured by various military organizations around the world.)

dog_jump3

skydiving_dog_11

Like their human counterparts, the dog SEALs are highly trained, highly skilled, highly motivated special ops experts, able to perform extraordinary military missions by SEa, Air and Land (thus the acronym).

The dogs carry out a wide range of specialized duties for the military teams to which they are attached: With a sense of smell 40 times greater than a human’s, the dogs are trained to detect and identify both explosive material and  hostile or hiding humans.

The dogs are twice as fast as a fit human, so anyone trying to escape is not likely to outrun Cairo or his buddies.

110504_wardogs4

The dogs, equipped with video cameras, also enter certain danger zones first, allowing their handlers to see what’s ahead before humans follow.

As I mentioned before, SEAL dogs are even trained parachutists, jumping either in tandem with their handlers or solo, if the jump is into water.

Last year canine parachute instructor Mike Forsythe and his dog Cara  set the world record for highest man-dog parachute deployment, jumping from more than 30,100 feet up — the altitude transoceanic passenger jets fly at. Both Forsythe and Cara were wearing oxygen masks and skin protectors for the jump.

Here’s a photo from that jump, taken by Andy Anderson for K9 Storm Inc. (more about those folks shortly).

SEALRecordJump

As well, the dogs are faithful, fearless and ferocious — incredibly frightening and efficient attackers.

I have seen it reported repeatedly that the teeth of SEAL war dogs are replaced with titanium implants that are stronger, sharper and scare-your-pants-off  intimidating, but a U.S. military spokesman has denied that charge, so I really don’t know (never having seen a canine SEAL face-to-face). I do know that I’ve never seen a photo of a war dog with anything even vaguely resembling a set of shiny metal chompers.

When the SEAL DevGru team (usually known by its old designation, Team 6) hit bin Laden’s Pakistan compound on May 2, Cairo’s feet would have been four of the first on the ground.

And like the human SEALs, Cairo was wearing super-strong, flexible body armour and outfitted with high-tech equipment that included “doggles” — specially designed and fitted dog googles with night-vision and infrared capability that would even allow Cairo to see human heat forms through concrete walls.

Now where on earth would anyone get that kind of incredibly niche hi-tech doggie gear?

From Winnipeg, of all places.

Jim and Glori Slater’s Manitoba hi-tech mom-and-pop business, K9 Storm Inc., has a deserved worldwide  reputation for designing and manufacturing probably the best body armour available for police and military dogs. Working dogs in 15 countries around the world are currently protected by their K9 Storm body armour.

K9-Storm-2

Jim Slater was a canine handler on the Winnipeg Police Force when he crafted a Kevlar protective jacket for his own dog, Olaf, in the mid-1990s. Soon Slater was making body armour for other cop dogs, then the Canadian military and soon the world.

The standard K9 Storm vest also has a load-bearing harness system that makes it ideal for tandem rappelling and parachuting.

Navy-Seal-Dog-1

And then there are the special hi-tech add-ons that made the K9 Storm especially appealing to the U.S. Navy SEALs, who bought four of  K9 Storm Inc.’s top-end Intruder “canine tactical assault suits” last year for $86,000. You can be sure Cairo was wearing one of those four suits when he jumped into bin Laden’s lair.

Here’s an explanation of all the K9 Storm Intruder special features:

K9-Storm

Just as the Navy SEALS and other elite special forces are the sharp point of the American military machine, so too are their dogs at the top of a canine military heirarchy.

In all, the U.S. military currently has about 2,800 active-duty dogs deployed around the world, with roughly 600 now in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Here’s the link to a dandy photo essay about U.S. war dogs that just appeared in the journal Foreign Policy.

Several of the photos I have included here are from Foreign Policy, as you will see. Other photos are from K9 Storm Inc.

110504_wardogs1

snf2630fly-main_1259920a

As for the ethics of sending dogs to war, that’s pretty much a moot point, don’t you think? If it’s ethical to send humans into combat, then why not dogs?

At least the U.S. now treats its war dogs as full members of the military. At the end of the Vietnam War, the U.S. combat dogs there were designated as “surplus military equipment” and left behind when American forces pulled out.

Canadian Connection To Raid On Bin Laden Compound

- May 12th, 2011

NOTE: This blog post is exactly the same as the one entitled “The Dog That Cornered Osama Bin Laden.” I just wanted to reflect two different aspects of the story in the headlines.

When U.S. President Barack Obama went to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, last week for a highly publicized but very private meeting with the commando team that killed Osama bin Laden, only one of the 81 members of the super-secret  SEAL DevGru unit was identified by name: Cairo, the war dog.

Cairo, like most canine members of the elite U.S. Navy SEALs, is a Belgian Malinois. The Malinois breed is similar to German shepherds but smaller and more compact, with an adult male weighing in the 30-kilo range.

skydiving_dog_04

(German shepherds are still used as war dogs by the American military but the lighter, stubbier Malinois is considered better for the tandem parachute jumping and rappelling operations often undertaken by SEAL teams. Labrador retrievers are also favoured by various military organizations around the world.)

dog_jump3

skydiving_dog_11

Like their human counterparts, the dog SEALs are highly trained, highly skilled, highly motivated special ops experts, able to perform extraordinary military missions by SEa, Air and Land (thus the acronym).

The dogs carry out a wide range of specialized duties for the military teams to which they are attached: With a sense of smell 40 times greater than a human’s, the dogs are trained to detect and identify both explosive material and  hostile or hiding humans.

The dogs are twice as fast as a fit human, so anyone trying to escape is not likely to outrun Cairo or his buddies.

110504_wardogs4

The dogs, equipped with video cameras, also enter certain danger zones first, allowing their handlers to see what’s ahead before humans follow.

As I mentioned before, SEAL dogs are even trained parachutists, jumping either in tandem with their handlers or solo, if the jump is into water.

Last year canine parachute instructor Mike Forsythe and his dog Cara  set the world record for highest man-dog parachute deployment, jumping from more than 30,100 feet up — the altitude transoceanic passenger jets fly at. Both Forsythe and Cara were wearing oxygen masks and skin protectors for the jump.

Here’s a photo from that jump, taken by Andy Anderson for K9 Storm Inc. (more about those folks shortly).

SEALRecordJump

As well, the dogs are faithful, fearless and ferocious — incredibly frightening and efficient attackers.

I have seen it reported repeatedly that the teeth of SEAL war dogs are replaced with titanium implants that are stronger, sharper and scare-your-pants-off  intimidating, but a U.S. military spokesman has denied that charge, so I really don’t know (never having seen a canine SEAL face-to-face). I do know that I’ve never seen a photo of a war dog with anything even vaguely resembling a set of shiny metal chompers.

When the SEAL DevGru team (usually known by its old designation, Team 6) hit bin Laden’s Pakistan compound on May 2, Cairo’s feet would have been four of the first on the ground.

And like the human SEALs, Cairo was wearing super-strong, flexible body armour and outfitted with high-tech equipment that included “doggles” — specially designed and fitted dog googles with night-vision and infrared capability that would even allow Cairo to see human heat forms through concrete walls.

Now where on earth would anyone get that kind of incredibly niche hi-tech doggie gear?

From Winnipeg, of all places.

Jim and Glori Slater’s Manitoba hi-tech mom-and-pop business, K9 Storm Inc., has a deserved worldwide  reputation for designing and manufacturing probably the best body armour available for police and military dogs. Working dogs in 15 countries around the world are currently protected by their K9 Storm body armour.

K9-Storm-2

Jim Slater was a canine handler on the Winnipeg Police Force when he crafted a Kevlar protective jacket for his own dog, Olaf, in the mid-1990s. Soon Slater was making body armour for other cop dogs, then the Canadian military and soon the world.

The standard K9 Storm vest also has a load-bearing harness system that makes it ideal for tandem rappelling and parachuting.

Navy-Seal-Dog-1

And then there are the special hi-tech add-ons that made the K9 Storm especially appealing to the U.S. Navy SEALs, who bought four of  K9 Storm Inc.’s top-end Intruder “canine tactical assault suits” last year for $86,000. You can be sure Cairo was wearing one of those four suits when he jumped into bin Laden’s lair.

Here’s an explanation of all the K9 Storm Intruder special features:

K9-Storm

Just as the Navy SEALS and other elite special forces are the sharp point of the American military machine, so too are their dogs at the top of a canine military heirarchy.

In all, the U.S. military currently has about 2,800 active-duty dogs deployed around the world, with roughly 600 now in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Here’s the link to a dandy photo essay about U.S. war dogs that just appeared in the journal Foreign Policy.

Several of the photos I have included here are from Foreign Policy, as you will see. Other photos are from K9 Storm Inc.

110504_wardogs1

snf2630fly-main_1259920a

As for the ethics of sending dogs to war, that’s pretty much a moot point, don’t you think? If it’s ethical to send humans into combat, then why not dogs?

At least the U.S. now treats its war dogs as full members of the military. At the end of the Vietnam War, the U.S. combat dogs there were designated as “surplus military equipment” and left behind when American forces pulled out.

Toronto Landmarks You Probably Don’t Know, Part 3

- May 9th, 2011

484-488Yonge

484-488 Yonge Street

Typical Yonge storefronts

The sushi restaurant , musical instrument store and electronics emporium now occupying the site are just the latest in a series of small businesses that have operated over the past two decades on this patch of Yonge a couple of blocks north of College.

But for anyone old enough to have been around Toronto two or three decades ago or with any sense at all of the cultural history of the city, the next photo I’m going to show you will trigger an A-Ha! of some sort.

So look up, Rusty, look waaaay up to what’s sitting above the storefronts at 484-488 Yonge St.

firetower

It’s the clock tower that used to be the beacon above the St. Charles Tavern, Toronto’s best-known gay bar from the 1950s into the 1980s.

But the clock tower’s historic significance goes much further back than the St. Charles.

The clock tower belongs to Toronto Fire Hall No. 3, built in 1870.

It’s one of three original, still-existing fire hall towers that I know of in Toronto, the other two being the Yorkville hall, built in 1878 (when the area was still the Village of Yorkville and not even part of Toronto for another five years), and the Balmoral hall on Hendrick Avenue in the Wychwood neighbourhood, built in 1911.

There’s a tower on old TDF Hall No. 8 at College and Bellevue near Kensington Market but, although the fire hall was built in 1878, the tower is a replica built in 1972.

There’s also a stubby clock tower on the Beaches fire hall at 1904 Queen St. E., but it doesn’t count because it’s just, well, a clock tower.

The clock was only a decorative flourish on the original towers: Their real purpose was to provide a high hanging space to dry out the hall’s canvas water hoses after use so they wouldn’t rot.

Old Fire Hall No. 3 at 484-488 Yonge St. served the city well but was finally closed down in 1929.

I’ve seen elsewhere that the firehall was a Chinese restaurant among other things before becoming the St. Charles Tavern, but that’s not the case.

Well, it is and it isn’t: The fire hall’s address was just 488 Yonge St. and the restaurant, the Ritz Cafe/later Grill, was located just south of it at what was then 486 Yonge — but the Ritz was never in the fire hall building.

The longtime successor business that occupied the fire hall was Ross Cycle & Sports, a family firm that operated there from the 1930s until the St. Charles opened in 1951 as part of the wave of post-war Toronto bar openings.

Just south of Ross Cycle and the Ritz was Lyons Furniture at 478 Yonge (it occupied space allocated to 470-478 Yonge but used only the 478 number) on the corner of Grenville.

When the Lyons building  burned to the ground in November 1941 (there’s a good photo of the fire if I can ever find it again — the file I thought I had of the photo is corrupt), the corner lot remained vacant for a decade and the businesses just north readjusted their street numbers — so the Ritz suddenly became 478 and the wide fire hall building was assigned the 484-488 double number.

LyonsFurniture

I found this lesser version of the Lyons fire photo. Notice the clock tower at the right edge of the picture.

Between Ross Cycle and the Ritz was another storefront, a gift shop called Arts & Crafts for a decade or so, that got the designation 480-482 Yonge. For a few years in the late ’50s, 482 Yonge St. was home to a quaint private club called the Empire Veterans of South Africa, a throwback methinks to the Boer War.

The Ritz outlasted Ross Cycle, finally becoming the City Park Restaurant in the late 1950s.

The vacant lot on the corner, now designated 470-476 Yonge St., was back in business again in 1951 as a used car showroom before becoming a Renault dealership for a few years in the early ’60s. The corner site is now a McDonald’s, as it has been for about 30 years.

But back to the St. Charles Tavern, which also opened in 1951 — a boom year for Toronto, by the way, which probably explains the sudden changeover in businesses along the Yonge Street strip.

The St. Charles was owned by Charles H. Hemstead — the reason for the bar’s name. Hemstead was a successful Toronto restaurateur and racing aficionado who owned  the 1943 Queen’s Plate winner Paolita. The St. Charles  started life as just another restaurant-cocktail lounge  answering the call from war vets for good times (including booze and music) in Toronto the Good.

The St. Charles’ ad slogan was “Meet me under the clock.”

NOTE: There should be a good photo of the St. Charles right here … but there just aren’t that many photos of the St. Charles around and I can’t come up with a good one at the moment. If you follow this link to urbantoronto.ca, you’ll find a good shot of the St. Charles (taken after 1967 because that’s the year Jokeland opened up the street) and you will also find a much, much better shot of the 1941 Lyons Furniture fire with more of the fire hall clock tower showing.

Partly because of its location and partly because of the tolerance of the ownership and straight customers in a relatively intolerant city, the St. Charles developed a growing clientele from Toronto’s emerging gay community.

By the early ’60s, the St. Charles was known to the general public primarily as a gay bar and was a magnet for both curiosity and abuse, especially at Halloween when the famed drag queen promenade would start there. (It was actually against Toronto’s morality laws well into the 1970s for a man to dress as a woman in this city. Oldtime queens recount how police would bodysearch them: If they were wearing women’s underwear, they would be arrested … or just beaten up.)

Here’s a link to a short video by Michael Pihach with some of the ’60s queens remembering the glory days, so to speak, of the St. Charles.

But as the city loosened up through the ’70s, as Toronto’s gay culture became more open and assertive, the St. Charles began to loose its lustre as a bastion of the gay community. With dozens of hot, hip new gay bars opening up, the St. Charles was left behind as a dumpy, frumpy old, um, dump. By Christmas 1987, it was closed, replaced by a string of bargain stores.

The clock tower too had fallen into disrepair and was in danger of being condemned as unsafe.

Fortunately the building’s owners, Harrow Holdings Ltd., showed a terrific sense of civic duty about a decade ago and paid for a restoration of the tower , including clock repairs, that will see it remain a Toronto landmark for decades to come.

Toronto Landmarks You Probably Don’t Know, Part 2

- May 5th, 2011

HMV

HMV Superstore

333 Yonge Street

Anybody who spends any time on lower Yonge Street knows the HMV store (technically Superstore, but it’s shrinking now) just north of Dundas Square.

For a while it was the biggest record-video-whatever store in Canada. It’s not anymore and, as online media take more and more business away from real music-movie stores, it may not even exist half a decade from now. So it doesn’t really qualify as a “landmark” on its own, does it?

Nope, but where HMV now stands is hallowed music ground for Toronto, Canada and maybe even the entire world. It is if you ask Rompin’ Ronnie Hawkins.

coqor

Because, before HMV arrived, 333 Yonge Street was the address for Le Coq D’Or Tavern, the heart and soul of Toronto’s 1960s Yonge Street music scene.

IMG_4460

Hawkins, the Arkansas rockabilly wildman, became King of Yonge Street when he arrived at the Coq in 1958, but the tavern was an established presence on Yonge Street for more than a decade before Rompin’ Ronnie arrived with Levon Helm and an early edition of The Hawks in tow.

RH pub copy

The city carried its Victorian reputation as Toronto the Good into the 1960s, but things had already started to loosen up by the mid-1940s when soldiers, sailors and airmen returning from the war demanded something approaching the same level of liberty and sophistication they had become used to in the pubs, bars and bistros of Britain and Europe.

The new, loosened Ontario liquor laws that came into effect in 1947 permitted cocktail bars with mixed drinking and entertainment in the province’s five largest cities (other municipalities had to hold referendums individually). And thus was born the music scene on the Yonge Street strip, with neon-tweeting bars springing up from the Colonial Tavern near Queen Street up to the Zanzibar and beyond.

1950YongeSouthFromElm

yonge-looking-N-from-dundas-1950

Coq-1950s

Before Hawkins arrived, the music was mainly crooners, country and dorky combos — but at least there was music.

When Ronnie and the boys blew into town, all that changed. By 1960, Toronto — and especially Yonge Street —  was a hotbed of rock, R&B, blues, folk and a hundred mixtures in between.

ys_01_rompin__ron_hawkins_quartet

RichieKnight&MidKnightsEdison1962a

KnightsMysticSea1973

ColonialAd

And Rompin’ Ronnie Hawkins was the king of that wild, jumping scene throughout the ’60s. And Le Coq D’Or was where Ronnie held court most nights, before moving next door and upstairs to his own Hawk’s Nest at 331 Yonge in the late ’60s.

kinks

Right next door to the Coq, at 335 Yonge, was the Edison Hotel, another rock and R&B mecca, that had been built in 1888 as the Empress hotel before changing its name and jumping on the swinging bar bandwagon in 1947.

Bill Haley @ Edison 08-12-58

Bo Diddley @ Edison 24-10-59

All good things must come to an end and, by the mid-1970s, the Yonge Street music scene had pretty much run its course, battered by disco and liberalized local laws that saw go-go dancers replaced by strippers in a matter of a couple of years (The Zanzibar, for example, used to be a hell of a blues club in the ’60s).

The Edison closed, the Colonial burned down, the Friar’s Tavern eventually became the Hard Rock Cafe, the Zanzibar went full stripper, the Hawk’s Nest became first Stravin’ Marvin’s Burlesque Palace and later Cinema 2000 porn theatre as body-rub parlours took over the strip.

Le Coq d'Or copy

Le Coq D’Or held on into the ’80s before finally yielding to the inevitable (I’ve got the exact date of its closing somewhere in my notes but can’t find it at the moment).

LeCoqD'Or1970s

By 1991, the building that held Le Coq D’Or and Cinema 2000 was torn down to make way for the new 25,000-square-foot HMV Superstore, which by 1995 had expanded further south to become the largest music store in Canada with 35,000 square feet of music and movies.

Now HMV is going through its own decline, downsizing over the past couple of weeks to its old 25,000-square-foot space.

Next door, where the Edison Hotel had been, a number of businesses tried to make a go of it before Salad King turned the location into a hot spot again, only to have a wall collapse last year, followed by a fire that resulted in the final demolition of the ruins.

Edwin?HotelSite

The fabulous Salad King, for those who don’t know, is back in business across the street, in a great space on the second floor  at 340 Yonge above the Foot Locker.

FootLocker&SaladKing

So some things die and new things grow, but we should keep at least a memory of magic times, people and places alive. Le Coq D’Or and Rompin’ Ronnie Hawkins — long may they live!

RonnieHawkinsPromoPhotoRonScribnerAgencyTorontoHawkRecords_med

Edison&CoqD'Or