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CRTC clears U.S. Super Bowl ads in Canada; Bell Media “extremely disappointed”

- January 29th, 2015

Canada_and_USA_Flag

Oh say, can you see the U.S. Super Bowl ads?

As of 2017, Canadians can answer, “Yes.”

That’s the year Canadians will be able to watch the American slate of Super Bowl commercials, live on their televisions during the game, rather than having to seek them out online.

So what will Canadians whine about now?

Kidding aside, the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) issued the following release on Thursday:

“Ads during the Super Bowl get a lot of hype. They are an important part of the overall spectacle … For Canadian viewers this has been a problem. They don’t see the same ads as those seen in the U.S. because they are replaced with Canadian ads … The CRTC has taken action to resolve the issue. Beginning at the end of the 2016 NFL season (i.e., the Super Bowl in 2017), simultaneous substitution will no longer be allowed during the Super Bowl. Canadian viewers will see the same ads as American viewers. Until then, you can watch the American ads broadcast during the Super Bowl on YouTube’s AdBlitz channel.”

I have to admit, I got sick of Canadians complaining about this through the years, and ultimately it sounds as if the CRTC did, too.

Hey, I always would have preferred to watch the U.S. commercials as well. It’s the repetition that drives me crazy with the Canadian ads during the Super Bowl, seeing the same irritating spots over and over and over again.

But having watched numerous Super Bowls in the States, Canadians shouldn’t be fooled into thinking every American ad that airs during the game is a gem. For some Canadians, after years of pining for the U.S. ads, come 2017 the reaction may be, “Hmmm … that was much ado about nothing.”

Be that as it may, this obviously impacts Bell Media, which is the Canadian rights-holder for the NFL.

“We are extremely disappointed of course,” Bell Media vice-president of communications Scott Henderson said in a statement. “The government is damaging the future of local television in Canada while rewarding U.S. corporations over home-grown companies.

“Sure viewers will get to watch Wells Fargo ads in the Super Bowl instead of RBC, or Target and Wal-Mart instead of Canadian Tire. But those advertising dollars will go directly to American companies instead of Canadian content creators and broadcasters.

“Canadian companies will also have a diminished opportunity to market their products to Canadians watching U.S. ads for products they probably can’t buy. It’s a troubling approach for a Canadian regulator to take.”

AS FOR THIS YEAR …

With the game airing Sunday, Feb. 1 on NBC and CTV, it’s true that not many other networks offer new episodes of anything, in the knowledge that the Super Bowl is a ratings vampire, sucking the life out of innocent bystanders.

Full speed ahead to PBS, though, which is airing a new (well, new to North America, anyway) episode of Downton Abbey on Sunday night. Let’s just say there could be a fight involved that might rival anything going on between the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots.

But if you’re not into Downton Abbey or football, there’s really only one logical thing to do.

Endure those around you screaming at the TV and wait for the halftime show, which this year features Katy Perry (pictured below). I can’t remember where I read this – probably it was on Twitter – but some clever person pointed out that with Frozen star Idina Menzel singing the national anthem and then with Perry at halftime, this is the first Super Bowl directed specifically at seven-year-old girls.

Then you endure more screaming as people get more drunk, and wait for the primo post-Super Bowl shows: The Blacklist on NBC (as well as Global); and the season-two debut of MasterChef Canada on CTV. MasterChef Canada was pushed up a week after CTV had to yank the sitcom Spun Out from the coveted post-Super Bowl slot, in response to the voyeurism charge against one of the actors, J.P. Manoux.

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv​

Capture KP

MasterChef Canada replaces Spun Out post-Super Bowl on CTV, due to voyeurism charge against actor

- January 28th, 2015

Capture MCC

Dinner simply will have to be ready a week earlier than planned.

CTV has announced that the second season of hit reality competition series MasterChef Canada will air immediately following the network’s coverage of Super Bowl XLIX, Sunday, Feb. 1.

The second season of MasterChef Canada originally had been slotted for Feb. 8, with the sitcom Spun Out scheduled to air after the Super Bowl. But CTV decided to yank Spun Out after news broke about the voyeurism charge against actor J.P. Manoux.

Spun Out has a big ensemble cast, but particularly in the current climate of Jian Ghomeshi and Bill Cosby, CTV had little choice but to take action. Spun Out is on hold indefinitely.

Two women allegedly found video equipment hidden in a Toronto condo they were renting. The condo has been rented out in the past by Manoux, according to police.

As for MasterChef Canada, the premiere episode of the second season picks up after the initial rounds of the audition process. The home cook finalists enter the nerve-wracking first phase of the competition as they present their signature dishes for tasting to judges Michael Bonacini, Alvin Leung and Claudio Aprile.

Bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv

Archer and Agent Carter read The Book of Negroes and start an Empire with Glee; TV for the week of Jan. 4

- January 4th, 2015

Anna Faris, Allison Janney, People's Choice Awards

Bill Harris’ TV must-sees for the week of Jan. 4

1 Marvel’s Agent Carter
Debut
Decades before the S.H.I.E.L.D. team, there was Agent Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell). She pledged a similar oath, but as a female in the 1940s, she had to fight from being marginalized when all the men returned home from World War II.
When: Tuesday, Jan. 6 on ABC, CTV

2 Downton Abbey
Fifth-season debut
Lord Grantham (Hugh Bonneville) feels a bit insulted when the townspeople choose someone else to head up a local project. Meanwhile, Lady Edith (Laura Carmichael) has trouble keeping her distance from her big secret.
When: Sunday, Jan. 4 on most PBS affiliates

3 People’s Choice Awards
Live
From the Nokia Theater in L.A., awards season kicks off by honouring fan favourites in movies, music and TV. Anna Faris and Allison Janney (pictured above) from the sitcom Mom are the hosts, with musical performances from Iggy Azalea and Fall Out Boy.
When: Wednesday, Jan. 7 on CBS, Global

4 The Book of Negroes
Debut
Six-part mini-series follows the harsh journey of Aminata Diallo (Aunjanue Ellis), who was abducted and enslaved as a child, but eventually returns home to West Africa. Also with Cuba Gooding, Jr., Lyriq Bent and Allan Hawco, among others.
When: Wednesday, Jan. 7 on CBC

5 Empire
Debut
Music-company kingpin Lucious Lyon (Terrence Howard) learns he has a disease and must choose one of his three sons to take over. But it gets even messier when Lucious’ ex-wife re-emerges unexpectedly and is determined to claim her share.
When: Wednesday, Jan. 7 on Fox

6 Archer
Sixth-season debut
Notice something different about this long-running animated series? The producers announced last fall that the spy agency no longer will be called the International Secret Intelligence Service – a.k.a., Isis – for obvious reasons.
When: Thursday, Jan. 8 on Teletoon

7 Sunnyside
Debut
Canadian sketch series featuring Kathleen Phillips and Pat Thornton centres on a quirky town where, for example, a voice from an open manhole replaces the internet. It’s the voice of Norm Macdonald, so I assume it’ll be sarcastic.
When: Thursday, Jan. 8 on City

8 Say Yes to the Dress Canada
Debut, back-to-back episodes
Set at a Toronto bridal boutique, Canadian brides must be more patient and polite than their American counterparts, right? Hello? Well, maybe brides are brides wherever you go, and they all speak the international language of tension.
When: Wednesday, Jan. 7 on W

9 UFOs Declassified
Debut
“Take me to your leader” aside, this six-episode series purports to present a balanced examination of the subject matter, with state-of-the-art CGI based on both eyewitness accounts and government/military documentation.
When: Friday, Jan. 9 on History

10 Glee
Sixth-season, two-hour debut
Upon learning that Sue (Jane Lynch) has banished the arts at McKinley High, Rachel (Lea Michele) endeavours to re-establish the glee club. More and more of the old gang will return home to help. Thank goodness this is the final season.
When: Friday, Jan. 9 on Fox, City

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv​

Robin Williams, Iggy Azalea, Frozen, True Detective top 2014 Google Canada trends for celebs and showbiz

- December 16th, 2014

Capture iggy azalea

Sorrowful and soulful, cold and hot. Robin Williams, True Detective, Frozen and Iggy Azalea (pictured above) were the biggest trends in their respective showbiz categories based on the top Google searches in Canada this year.

Google Canada released its “Year in Search” results early on Tuesday.

Williams topped the list of trending celebrities for the most tragic of reasons, of course. The legendary comedian committed suicide on Aug. 11.

Also trending for the wrong reasons was ex-CBC Radio host Jian Ghomeshi, who came in at No. 5 among celebrities. I’ll bet a lot of people who Googled Ghomeshi couldn’t even spell his name before the scandal broke regarding his sexual activities which allegedly involved criminal physical assault.

The star power of Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson clearly helped to push the HBO series True Detective to the top of the trending TV list.

Animation ruled the day with trending movies, as Frozen iced the competition and led the way.

And in an impressive doubling up, Azalea not only was the top trending musician of 2014, she also finished 10th on the list of top trending celebs overall.

Google Canada’s Top Trending Celebrities of 2014:
1. Robin Williams
2. Philip Seymour Hoffman
3. Jennifer Lawrence
4. Joan Rivers
5. Jian Ghomeshi
6. Renée Zellweger
7. Tracy Morgan
8. Ellen Page
9. Kim Kardashian
10. Iggy Azalea

Google Canada’s Top Trending TV Shows of 2014:
1. True Detective
2. Game of Thrones
3. The Bachelor
4. Orange is the New Black
5. Gotham
6. House of Cards
7. Arrow
8. The Good Wife
9. The Walking Dead
10. The Flash

Google Canada’s Top Trending Movies of 2014:
1. Frozen
2. Interstellar
3. Divergent
4. Godzilla
5. Gone Girl
6. American Hustle
7. 22 Jump Street
8. The Lego Movie
9. Lone Survivor
10. Dallas Buyers Club

Google Canada’s Top Trending Musicians of 2014:
1. Iggy Azalea
2. Ariana Grande
3. Taylor Swift
4. Nicki Minaj
5. Daft Punk
6. Lorde
7. Weird Al
8. Conchita Wurst
9. A Great Big World
10. Katy Perry

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv

 

The McCarthys trial; loud and proud, sports-mad Boston clan focus of new sitcom

- October 26th, 2014

The McCarthys cast, two

There are family connections everywhere you look on The McCarthys.

If you tune in for the debut, Thursday, Oct. 30 on CBS and CTV, the first thing you’ll notice is the lead character is played by Tyler Ritter, brother of Jason and son of John.

“I was very impressionable as a young kid, I grew up around the sets of Hearts Afire, which was also a multi-cam sitcom,” Tyler Ritter said. “I got to see my father enjoy himself at his work. And I think any young child who sees that starts taking notes subconsciously. So I did that all my life.

“I got to see my brother on The Class, also in the same format. And I got to see him just loving every second of it, all while preparing and being responsible with their work and getting to make a couple hundred people (in the studio audience) laugh once a week.

“So I don’t actively try to emulate their work. I think we share enough mannerisms and physical characteristics that if I added anything on top of that, it would be disturbing.”

At which point Brian Gallivan, executive producer of The McCarthys, chimed in, “There would be moments where we said, ‘Oh my, that’s John Ritter,’ but with Tyler putting his own wonderful spin on it. So we feel very lucky to have him.

“I think I was writing (the character played by Ritter) as a young Brian Gallivan, but we shifted because actual Brian Gallivan became old Brian Gallivan. We were just looking for the actor who could bring this character to life, and Tyler was by far our favourite choice.”

As you may have gleaned from Gallivan’s comments, The McCarthys loosely is based on his own family.

“They demanded I tell you that, especially my sisters,” Gallivan explained. “But they also said, ‘You tell them we’ve never had a DUI. We’ve never carried a dead man’s baby.’ So now I’ve told you.

“I pointed out to my family that, in creating a sitcom, sitcoms need characters with flaws. So I had to add flaws that aren’t there in our family in real life. And sitcoms also require heartwarming moments, so I also had to add heartwarming moments that don’t exist in our real life.

“They were like, ‘Okay, that seems fair.’ ”

The McCarthys is about a close-knit, sports-crazed Boston family. Son Ronny (Ritter) is fine with the close-knit part of it, but as a gay man, he is considering moving away for a new job, becoming more active in the singles scene and trying harder to find a partner. On top of that, Ronny isn’t a sports aficionado, which always has set him apart from his clan.

Ronny suddenly is presented with a new option, however, when his father Arthur (Jack McGee), a politically incorrect high school basketball coach, stuns everyone by offering Ronny an assistant coaching position.

Ronny has two brothers and a sister – Gerard (Joey McIntyre from New Kids on the Block), Sean (Jimmy Dunn) and Jackie (Kelen Coleman) – who are far more qualified from a hoops perspective. But maybe Ronny has something in his personality that they lack.

Either way, mom Marjorie (Laurie Metcalf) simply is thrilled that this might mean Ronny stays put in Boston.

“We tried a single-camera version of this show (no studio audience) two years ago,” Gallivan recalled. “When I was first writing it, I was working as a writer on Happy Endings, rest in peace, which was a single-camera show that I loved. So that was sort of the mode I was in.

“But then, because this family (on The McCarthys) expresses love through insulting each other and being hateful, in a single-cam that was a little dark. With a multi-cam, we found it was more fun to have the audience laughing and enjoying it.”

So insults are more palatable in front of a big group of people, got it.

Then again, maybe that’s more of a TV lesson than a real-life lesson.

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv