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First Charlie Sheen, now Angus T. Jones; is it all Jon Cryer’s fault?

- November 27th, 2012

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So what is it about Jon Cryer that pushes his co-stars to such extremes?

Another question: Will the newly God-fearing Angus T. Jones (pictured above, getting closer to God) give back all the money he has earned from “trashy” Two and a Half Men?

If you haven’t heard about it, this week some online videos emerged featuring Jones urging people to stop watching Two and a Half Men. The kicker, of course, is that Jones is on Two and a Half Men, playing Jake, the son of Cryer’s character Alan.

These videos have not gone viral by accident. Jones wanted them to come out, even saying at one point, “Maybe this will mean more coming from me.”

I’m kidding, of course, about Cryer (pictured below left, with Jones at right) somehow being responsible for all this. But it is intriguing that Two and a Half Men is the same show from which Charlie Sheen’s bizarre, self-destructive behaviour emerged last spring.

Sheen eventually was fired. And he was the series lead. One would have to assume that the producers of Two and a Half Men would lose less sleep over the jettisoning of Jones, who was hilarious when he was a squirt but in truth has been dead weight on Two and a Half Men for at least three or four years.

So the 19-year-old Jones has found God. What goes on between the two of them is none of my business. But Jones should stay out of everyone else’s business, too.

It’s easier to be preachy once you’ve made a fortune from the very thing you’re preaching against.

Angus T. Jones says he doesn’t want to be on Two and a Half Men any more. Christmas is coming. Please, please, please, grant him this gift.

And if you’re really seriously saying that you’ve found religion, Angus, give all the cash back from the “filth” machine that is Two and a Half Men. Money where your mouth is, kid.

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv

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From Made in Jersey to maid in Jersey; fall TV’s winners and losers thus far

- October 12th, 2012

Janet Montgomery of Made in Jersey

It’s pretty early to be analyzing the winners and losers of the fall TV season. Some of the biggest new shows just debuted this week, with still more to come.

But snap judgments are fun, so why the hell not?

Please note that any mention of ratings pertains to U.S. ratings. While the performance of these series in Canada obviously is very important to CTV, Citytv and Global, the survival or cancelation of American shows is determined only by numbers in the United States.

WINNERS SO FAR

Revolution (NBC, Citytv)
This has been a non-electrified bolt of lightning and was rewarded when NBC announced last week that it was committing to a full season. These “Lost wannabe” types of series have not done well in recent years, so there must be something revolutionary about Revolution.

Go On (NBC, Global)
I’m still debating how funny this new Matthew Perry project actually is. It’s charming enough, though, and NBC has committed to a full season.

The New Normal (NBC, CTV)
One of the biggest-buzz new sitcoms, individual episodes have careened from hilarious (Obama Mama) to uncomfortable (Nanagasm) to suffocatingly preachy (Bryanzilla). Nonetheless, this got a full-season order from NBC, too.

CONDITIONAL WINNERS

The Mindy Project (Fox, Citytv)
The other biggest-buzz new sitcom, I was a bit surprised when, earlier this week, Fox picked it up for a full season so quickly. The numbers aren’t great, but sometimes you gotta dance with who you heavily promoted.

Ben and Kate (Fox, Citytv)
I thought Nat Faxon would be carrying this show, but Dakota Johnson was really funny in the episode titled Bad Cop/Bad Cop. Again, the numbers are mediocre at best, and it was a surprising full-season pickup by Fox so early. But I’m happy about it.

Vegas (CBS, Global)
Often retro is no-go for viewers, but the numbers for this 1960s-set project starring Dennis Quaid and Michael Chiklis have held up nicely. The audience skews old, though, which doesn’t impress advertisers.

Elementary (CBS, Global)
As a modern Sherlock Holmes, Jonny Lee Miller needs to dial down his performance just a little bit. But the ratings have been acceptable, even though this is yet another older-skewing show for CBS.

LOSERS SO FAR

Made in Jersey (CBS, Global)
Star Janet Montgomery (pictured above) just applied to be a “maid in Jersey.” Okay, bad joke. This is the first show to get yanked from a network sked.

The Mob Doctor (Fox, CTV)
This series is getting roughed up on Monday nights in the States (CTV is airing it on Sundays). Many observers expect it to get whacked soon.

Partners (CBS, Citytv)
These dudes aren’t faring any better on Mondays. Moving Two and a Half Men to Thursdays has hurt the CBS Monday comedy block more that most people expected.

666 Park Avenue (ABC, Citytv)
The previous plum timeslot of Sundays at 10 p.m. has become problematic for ABC. Last season Pan Am couldn’t fly. Now this series appears to be trapped in the basement with the ghosts.

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv

Charlie Sheen’s “Anger” builds more slowly in Canada

- June 27th, 2012

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Apparently it just takes Canadians a little longer to get angry.

You may know this already, but we offer the following as a final public-service clarification with regard to the broadcast schedule for Charlie Sheen’s new series Anger Management (the picture above is from the show, not from Charlie’s real life).

Anger Management makes its debut on the cable channel FX in the United States on Thursday, June 28. In Canada, however, Anger Management won’t be airing regularly until the fall, on CTV.

The Canadian network plans to promote the hell out of Anger Management during its coverage of the London Summer Olympics, and will “stunt launch” the first episode of the Sheen series after the Games, meaning some time in August. The specific date has not been announced yet.

If Anger Management is on FX in the States, why isn’t it on FX Canada, you ask?

Well, FX Canada – which is owned by Rogers – has the right of first refusal to acquire anything FX actually produces itself. Because FX did not make Anger Management, but merely purchased it from a studio, it was open to the highest bidder in Canada. Bell Media (which owns CTV) emerged as the winner, or loser, depending upon how much you like or dislike Charlie Sheen.

We’ve seen the first episode of Anger Management. It actually seems like it will be a better fit on CTV than on FX. The tone is very Two and a Half Men-ish, and FX is known for edgier stuff.

Regardless, curious Canadians will have to wait a bit longer as the anger builds.

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

@billharris_tv